Pictures

Here are some of the pictures you will find in Young Soldiers Amazing Warriors.  Taken by Robert Sholly during his tours in the Vietnam War.

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Captain Robert Sholly making notes in his journal during some quiet time on a resupply day. In the central highlands, somewhere west of Pleiku near the Cambodian border.

Captain Robert Sholly making notes in his journal during some quiet time on a resupply day. In the central highlands, somewhere west of Pleiku near the Cambodian border.


The South Vietnamese government moved entire villages along the Cambodian/South Vietnam border to areas further inland to deny their support for the North Vietnamese. U.S. troops were used to provide security during the relocation of these villages and once the population had left, burned the village structures to ensure the enemy could not use them. The relocation program was a sad thing, but it did sterilize large areas so there was no question about whether the local populace were innocent bystanders or not. These areas became “free-fire zones” between opposing forces of the North Vietnamese and South Vietnamese supported by U.S. military.

The South Vietnamese government moved entire villages along the Cambodian/South Vietnam border to areas further inland to deny their support for the North Vietnamese. U.S. troops were used to provide security during the relocation of these villages and once the population had left, burned the village structures to ensure the enemy could not use them. The relocation program was a sad thing, but it did sterilize large areas so there was no question about whether the local populace were innocent bystanders or not. These areas became “free-fire zones” between opposing forces of the North Vietnamese and South Vietnamese supported by U.S. military.


This was a rare occasion on which Company B, 1-8th Infantry had an opportunity to walk a cleared road. This particular march was being taken after a morning cross country march of 15 kilometers had already been accomplished. The company had then been directed to make another forced march of 20 kilometers to secure a new area in preparation for the building of a new firebase. All before dark. There were few stragglers and the time schedule was kept.

This was a rare occasion on which Company B, 1-8th Infantry had an opportunity to walk a cleared road. This particular march was being taken after a morning cross country march of 15 kilometers had already been accomplished. The company had then been directed to make another forced march of 20 kilometers to secure a new area in preparation for the building of a new firebase. All before dark. There were few stragglers and the time schedule was kept.


One of the tragic pictures shown too often throughout the Vietnam War. In many cases helicopters could not land in deep jungle, so casualties had to be winched out of holes in the forest canopy. When a wounded soldier was unable to ride a "cage" up through the tree tops, a stretcher was used. The soldier was lashed down tightly to the stretcher so he would not fall. It took a great deal of piloting skill to hover over a hole in the jungle, while a crewmember manned a winch to bring the stretcher up to the aircraft. In very tight conditions, the crewmember also had to keep the pilot appraised of when the stretcher was in danger of getting caught in the tree branches, or when the wind or rotor wash was affecting the upward trajectory of the stretcher. The helicopter pilots were everybody's heroes.

One of the tragic pictures shown too often throughout the
Vietnam War. In many cases helicopters could not land in deep jungle, so casualties had to be winched out of holes in the forest canopy. When a wounded soldier was unable to ride a “cage” up through the tree tops, a stretcher was used. The soldier was lashed down tightly to the stretcher so he would not fall. It took a great deal of piloting skill to hover over a hole in the jungle, while a crewmember manned a winch to bring the stretcher up to the aircraft. In very tight conditions, the crewmember also had to keep the pilot appraised of when the stretcher was in danger of getting caught in the tree branches, or when the wind or rotor wash was affecting the upward trajectory of the stretcher. The helicopter pilots were everybody’s heroes.

One of the tragic pictures shown too often throughout the Vietnam War. In many cases helicopters could not land in deep jungle, so casualties had to be winched out of holes in the forest canopy. When a wounded soldier was unable to ride a “cage” up through the tree tops, a stretcher was used. The soldier was lashed down tightly to the stretcher so he would not fall. It took a great deal of piloting skill to hover over a hole in the jungle, while a crewmember manned a winch to bring the stretcher up to the aircraft. In very tight conditions, the crewmember also had to keep the pilot appraised of when the stretcher was in danger of getting caught in the tree branches, or when the wind or rotor wash was affecting the upward trajectory of the stretcher. The helicopter pilots were everybody’s heroes.


Men of the 1-8th Infantry cross a stream in the central highlands of Vietnam. A security group has already crossed the stream and is ensuring there are no enemy forces waiting to attack the soldiers as they are crossing.

Men of the 1-8th Infantry cross a stream in the central highlands of Vietnam. A security group has already crossed the stream and is ensuring there are no enemy forces waiting to attack the soldiers as they are crossing.


On resupply days, the infantry companies stood down from active long-range patrolling to receive C rations, uniforms, ammunition and other items that were needed. The two connected ponchos in the foreground were the company radio operator’s temporary”hooch” used for rain and sun shelters. Other poncho leantos can be seen in the background. Unseen around this small area is an entire company of infantrymen who are manning a security perimeter while the administrative business of resupply goes on.

On resupply days, the infantry companies stood down from active long-range patrolling to receive C rations, uniforms, ammunition and other items that were needed. The two connected ponchos in the foreground were the company radio operator’s temporary”hooch” used for rain and sun shelters. Other poncho leantos can be seen in the background. Unseen around this small area is an entire company of infantrymen who are manning a security perimeter while the administrative business of resupply goes on.


This is a picture of LTC Harold Lee transferring command of the 1st Bn, 8th Infantry in March 1967 to LTC Timothy Gannon. This was accomplished in the 1-8th’s firebase west of Pleiku, Vietnam in the central highlands, so there would be as little interruption as possible in conduct of the war.

 

This is a picture of LTC Harold Lee transferring command of the 1st Bn, 8th Infantry in March 1967 to LTC Timothy Gannon. This was accomplished in the 1-8th’s firebase west of Pleiku, Vietnam in the central highlands, so there would be as little interruption as possible in conduct of the war.


At odd moments in the life of an infantryman, we were able to take time to revel in a small stream and wash our clothes and ourselves. This was a luxury and was taken advantage of whenever possible. In this instance, Company B and Company C had been linked together for a short time for resupply and it was a perfect time for the troops to enjoy the moment. Under strict security, parts of the two companies were permitted to take their turns at bathing and washing their worn clothes.

At odd moments in the life of an infantryman, we were able to take time to revel in a small stream and wash our clothes and ourselves. This was a luxury and was taken advantage of whenever possible. In this instance, Company B and Company C had been linked together for a short time for resupply and it was a perfect time for the troops to enjoy the moment. Under strict security, parts of the two companies were permitted to take their turns at bathing and washing their worn clothes.


Evacuating casualties. A sight that became all too familiar. Oftentimes these brave unknown helicopter pilots came into landing zones that were still under fire to pick up the most grievously wounded at the risk of their own lives. They were our guardian angels, to whom many of us owe our survival and to whom we can never repay the debt.

Evacuating casualties. A sight that became all too familiar. Oftentimes these brave unknown helicopter pilots came into landing zones that were still under fire to pick up the most grievously wounded at the risk of their own lives. They were our guardian angels, to whom many of us owe our survival and to whom we can never repay the debt.


Sunrise at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. Refueling stop for aircraft flying from the U.S. to Vietnam!

Sunrise at Clark Air Force Base in the Philippines. Refueling stop for aircraft flying from the U.S. to Vietnam!


Rice paddies after a rain. I was on an aerial reconnaissance of the area of operations in preparation for an air combat assault.

Rice paddies after a rain. I was on an aerial reconnaissance of the area of operations in preparation for an air combat assault.


Moving through the thick jungle at mid-day.

Moving through the thick jungle at mid-day.


An artillery round has been fired to the flank of the approach march to unsettle any enemy who might be lurking in the woods and to establish a fire concentration from which the artillery forward observer could adjust fire quickly in the event of an enemy contact.

An artillery round has been fired to the flank of the approach march to unsettle any enemy who might be lurking in the woods and to establish a fire concentration from which the artillery forward observer could adjust fire quickly in the event of an enemy contact.


Traveling between points, the helicopters flew as high as they could to avoid taking ground fire. When making insertions of troops, however, they flew rapid nap of the earth routes to keep the enemy from targeting them and their loads.

Traveling between points, the helicopters flew as high as they could to avoid taking ground fire. When making insertions of troops, however, they flew rapid nap of the earth routes to keep the enemy from targeting them and their loads.


This was taken after a firefight and rain. It seemed to establish the proper mood.

This was taken after a firefight and rain. It seemed to establish the proper mood.


6-29th Artillery shoots a fire mission for one of the infantry companies. There were generally six of these 105 mm Howitzers in a battalion firebase to provide indirect fire support for the battalion’s infantry companies and whomever else needed fire support and were in range.

6-29th Artillery shoots a fire mission for one of the infantry companies. There were generally six of these 105 mm Howitzers in a battalion firebase to provide indirect fire support for the battalion’s infantry companies and whomever else needed fire support and were in range.


Camp Enari, the base camp of the 4th Infantry Division near Pleiku, Vietnam after a morning rain shower.

Camp Enari, the base camp of the 4th Infantry Division near Pleiku, Vietnam after a morning rain shower.


An awards ceremony held at Camp Enari, 4th Infantry Division’s headquarters outside of Pleiku, Vietnam. These were new uniforms issued especially for the ceremony. The regular uniforms were considered too dirty and dusty to grace the rear area. The silver captain insignia on the individual helmet standing in line was never worn in the field. Only camouflaged insignia were used to keep the enemy from targeting soldiers in leadership positions.

An awards ceremony held at Camp Enari, 4th Infantry Division’s headquarters outside of Pleiku, Vietnam. These were new uniforms issued especially for the ceremony. The regular uniforms were considered too dirty and dusty to grace the rear area. The silver captain insignia on the individual helmet standing in line was never worn in the field. Only camouflaged insignia were used to keep the enemy from targeting soldiers in leadership positions.


Aerial view of some of the the highlands west of Pleiku. This picture was taken as we were preparing to make a combat assault into a “hot” LZ. Note the river valley with cleared fields, bracketed by forest and jungle.

Aerial view of some of the the highlands west of Pleiku. This picture was taken as we were preparing to make a combat assault into a “hot” LZ. Note the river valley with cleared fields, bracketed by forest and jungle.


Some of the open terrain found in between jungle and forest locations.

Some of the open terrain found in between jungle and forest locations.


Undergrowth through which we had to travel in looking for the NVA or VC. This picture was taken at mid-day. The darkness made it difficult to spot someone who was in a camouflaged position.

Undergrowth through which we had to travel in looking for the NVA or VC. This picture was taken at mid-day. The darkness made it difficult to spot someone who was in a camouflaged position.


Red clay being prepared for a military location west of Pleiku, Vietnam, central highlands.

Red clay being prepared for a military location west of Pleiku, Vietnam, central highlands.


LTC Gannon, Bn Commander, 1-8th Inf overseeing a firefight. April 1967.

LTC Gannon, Bn Commander, 1-8th Inf overseeing a firefight. April 1967.